Classical Civilization for the Logic Stage

One-semester course. In this course, students will explore the achievements, practices, and beliefs of the ancient Greeks and Romans which have shaped our world of today. We will learn how the modern world is indebted to Roman and Greek accomplishments, including advances in the construction of roads and buildings, the establishment of legal and political systems, and the development of genres in art and literature.  We will investigate cultural practices in ancient Greece and Rome, such as religious rituals, rites of passage, and societal structures, and make connections between those and the practices of our own cultures. The study of these accomplishments and practices will ultimately teach us about the perspectives, attitudes, and values of these ancient civilizations; how the Greeks and Romans viewed their world; and what it meant to be a Greek or Roman.

This course, classified as a social studies course, is designed as a supplement to a Latin or Greek language course or to an ancient history course, for students who are interested in studying Greek and Roman daily life and customs in depth. It will also provide additional preparation for Latin students taking the National Latin Exam, or for students participating in the National Roman Civilization Exam. It is also appropriate for students who have not studied Greek or Latin, or who are not yet ready for language study, but are interested in learning more about the ancient world.  This course will develop students’ reading, writing, and critical thinking skills.

Please note: The texts for this course address aspects of the classical world that some families may find objectionable, in particular violence and ancient customs concerning sexuality. While these topics are not part of the course content, and all assigned readings and lectures will be age appropriate, parents should be aware that the textbook contains this additional content. If you have any concerns, we encourage you to check the texts out at the local library before enrolling your student. 

Please Review Before Registering


  • Example Syllabus (Download the PDF)
  • Click here to purchase the course texts.
    • Handbook to Life in Ancient Greece, Lesley Adkins and Roy A. Adkins
    • Handbook to Life in Ancient Rome, Lesley Adkins and Roy A. Adkins
  • Class meets once per week for 50-55 minutes.
  • Class cap: 20 students.
  • Designed for grades 7-9.
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